Dr.Sapna Soni Owner
Canine Atopic Dermatitis
  • Date:2019-12-06 11:38:37
  • 1 Comment
  • Posted By: Dr Sapna Soni
  • Category: Clinical conditions in dogs and cats

It is a skin problem in which allergic symptoms develops following exposure to substances that are usually harmless, but have triggered an allergic response. In fact, this is the second most common allergic skin disease in dogs. Two of the most common causes are dust mites and pollen, which are difficult for pets to avoid because dust mites and pollen are everywhere. The most common symptoms of Canine AtopicDermatitis include itching, excessive scratching, rubbing on the carpet, hair loss, greasy or flaky skin with a foul odor, excessive chewing on the paws and areas such as the groin and armpits. Over time, the skin that is scratched can develop hot spots, inflamed areas – that may become infected. This is because there are a higher proportion of mast cells, which release histamines and other vasoactive substances in the face of an allergic challenge, in the skin of dogs. Symptoms of atopic dermatitis varies depending upon the quantity of histamine release.

Some dogs are more prone to developing allergies than others. Dog atopic dermatitis is especially prevalent in Boxers, Bulldogs, Retrievers, Beagles and Dalmatians although any breed of dog can develop it. In fact, the incidence of atopic dermatitis in dogs is increasing every year.

If your dog develops signs of atopic dermatitis, he or she should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. Steroids or anti-itch shampoos can help relieve the itching in the short-term, and antihistamines can get the allergies under control for a period of time. In severe cases where the dog’s skin is infected, antibiotics may be needed to overcome the damage. It’s also important to minimize your pet’s exposure to the allergens if at all possible, otherwise they will return once treatment is halted.

PREVENTING CANINE ATOPIC DERMATITIS:

There are many ways by which you can avoid atopic dermatitis. You can’t avoid pollen entirely since your dog will spend time out of doors, but you can minimize the potential for an allergic reaction by providing clean and fresh indoor air.

Visit to your vet as soon as you find any symptoms related to canine atopic dermatitis.

Dr.Sapna Soni Owner
Canine Hip Dysplasia
  • Date:2019-12-31 07:26:11
  • 0 Comment
  • Posted By: Dr Sapna Soni
  • Category: Clinical conditions in dogs and cats

Canine hip dysplasia is a common skeletal condition, more common in large or giant breed dogs, although it can occur in smaller breeds, as well.The hip joint functions as a ball and socket. In dogs with hip dysplasia, the ball and socket do not fit or develop properly, rubbing and grinding instead of sliding smoothly. This results in deterioration over time and an eventual loss of function of the joint itself.

Causes of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs:

Several factors lead to the development of hip dysplasia in dogs, beginning with genetics. Hip dysplasia is hereditary and is especially common in large and giant breed dogs, like the Great Dane, Saint Bernard, Labrador Retriever, and German Shepherd Dog. Factors such as excessive growth rate, types of exercise, and improper weight and nutrition can magnify this genetic predisposition.

Improper nutrition can also influence a dog’s likelihood of developing hip dysplasia, as can too much exercise – or too little. Obesity puts a lot of stress on your dog’s joints, which can exacerbate a pre-existing condition such as hip dysplasia or even cause hip dysplasia.

Symptoms of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs:

Some dogs begin to show signs of hip dysplasia when they are as young as four months of age, while other dogs develop it in conjunction with osteoarthritis as they age. In both cases, there are quite a few symptoms associated with hip dysplasia that larger breed dog owners should be familiar with. These symptoms may vary depending on the severity of the disease, the level of inflammation, the degree of looseness in the joint, and how long the dog has suffered from hip dysplasia.

  • Decreased activity
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Difficulty or reluctance rising, jumping, running, or climbing stairs
  • Lameness in the hind end
  • Looseness in the joint
  • Narrow stance
  • Swaying, “bunny hopping” gait
  • Grating in the joint during movement
  • Loss of thigh muscle mass
  • Noticeable enlargement of the shoulder muscles as they compensate for the hind end
  • Pain
  • Stiffness

Diagnosing Hip Dysplasia in Dogs:

At your dog’s regular checkup, your veterinarian will perform a physical exam. Sometimes this exam is enough for your veterinarian to suspect hip dysplasia. 

If you or your veterinarian suspect hip dysplasia, one of the first things that your veterinarian will do is manipulate your dog’s hind legs to test the looseness of the joint and to check for any grinding, pain, or reduced range of motion. Your dog’s physical exam may include blood work because inflammation due to joint disease can be indicated in the complete blood count. Your veterinarian will also need a history of your dog’s health and symptoms, any possible incidents or injuries that may have contributed to these symptoms, and any information you have about your dog’s parentage.

The definitive diagnosis usually comes with a radiograph (x-ray). Your veterinarian will take radiographs of your dog’s hips to determine the degree and severity of the hip dysplasia, which will help determine the best course of treatment for your dog.

Treating Hip Dysplasia in Dogs:

There are quite a few treatment options for hip dysplasia in dogs, ranging from lifestyle modifications to surgery. Depending on your dog’s case, the vet may suggest the following:

  • Weight reduction to take stress off of the hips
  • Exercise restriction, especially on hard surfaces
  • Physical therapy
  • Anti-inflammatory medications (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), aspirin, corticosteroids)

Dr.Sapna Soni Owner
Pseudo pregnancy in canine
  • Date:2019-12-31 07:43:35
  • 0 Comment
  • Posted By: Dr Sapna Soni
  • Category: Clinical conditions in dogs and cats

Pseudo-pregnancy refer to a display of maternal (mothering) behavior combined with the physical signs of pregnancy following estrus ("heat") in a female dog that is not actually pregnant. It is also called false pregnancy, phantom pregnancy or pseudocyesis. A false pregnancy may occur in a dog, regardless of whether or not she was mated. The majority of intact female dogs will show some signs of false pregnancy after an estrus cycle.

Signs & symptoms of Pseudopregnancy:

Symptoms of false pregnancy usually begin four to nine weeks after the previous heat period, and mimic the symptoms of true pregnancy. The more common signs of pseudo-pregnancy include mammary gland enlargement with or without the production of milk, lethargy, periodic vomiting, and fluid retention. The female often has a decreased appetite but seldom appears to lose weight, probably due to the amount of excess fluid she retains.

These symptoms can occur at any age and do not necessarily follow every estrus. The severity of the clinical signs varies between individuals and may vary from one cycle to the next in the same dog.

Behavioral changes of pseudo-pregnancy include nesting, mothering activity, restlessness, decreased interest in physical activity and occasionally even aggression. Some affected dogs will show signs of a false labor and then protectively guard toys or other small objects.

Causes of pseudopregnancy:

After the female dog has an estrus cycle, her ovaries begin to produce hormones, regardless of whether she is pregnant or not. These hormones prepare the uterus to receive the fetuses and maintain pregnancy. If the dog is pregnant, the hormones will continue to be produced until shortly before the puppies are born. If she is not pregnant, the levels of the hormones begin to decline after 4-6 weeks. In the early stages, the increased levels of circulating hormones cause changes that mimic pregnancy. As the hormone levels decline in the non-pregnant dog, they send signals to the body that stimulate false labor and mammary gland development. The reason that these hormonal changes occur in the non-pregnant dog remains a mystery.

Treatment:

Mild cases of false pregnancy do not require treatment since the symptoms will subside in approximately 14-21 days.

If the dog appears physically ill or the behavioral changes are severe enough to cause concern, treatment is indicated. Treatment is symptomatic, and may include 

tranquilization to relieve anxiety, treatment with diuretics in order to reduce the milk production or relieve fluid retention; in rare cases, hormonal treatment may be required.

If the female will not be used for breeding, ovariohysterectomy is recommended to prevent future episodes. Ideally, this surgical sterilization should be performed after all symptoms have resolved. 

 

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